The Energy Consumer's Bulletin- a New England energy news blog

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Rhode Islanders: Take Action for Clean Cars

Important legislation is being heard TODAY in Rhode Island that would direct the Ocean State to adopt advanced vehicle emissions standards out of California as long as they are more stringent than federal law. Adopting such standards, like Advanced Clean Cars II and Advanced Clean Trucks, is crucial to Rhode Island’s ability to reduce greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions 45% by 2030, as required by an Act on Climate. Rhode Islanders can take action to support this important legislation by testifying at a hearing TODAY (Thursday, March 30) or submitting written comments. Here are all the details you’ll need.

Anna Vanderspek and Amanda Barker

The Latest IPCC Report & What It Means for Massachusetts & Rhode Island

On Monday, the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC)released its most recent report, whichstatesin no uncertain terms that we need to increase the pace of greenhouse gas emissions reductions. To avoid the worst effects of climate change, the IPCC report said we must reduce carbon emissions by two thirds by 2035.With the release of the report, United NationsSecretary General António Guterres called on developed nations to achieve net-zero emissions by as close to 2040 as possible, rather than the 2050 date that has been the standard – and the date around which Massachusetts and Rhode Island climate policy has developed. What does this latest international call for urgency and speed mean for our work here in Massachusetts and Rhode Island?

Larry Chretien & Anna Vanderspek

Transportation Electrification Bills That Matter in Massachusetts

Per the Clean Energy & Climate Plan for 2025 and 2030, Massachusetts must reduce greenhouse gas emissions in the transportation sector 34% by 2030 for the economy as a whole to cut emissions in half compared to 1990. Last year’s climate bill made some good progress on this front: adjusting the state’s MOR-EV rebate, creating a fund to support the build-out of charging infrastructure, committing to a phase-out of new gas-powered cars by 2035, and setting timelines for MBTA bus fleet electrification. Though a promising start, there’s much more to be done. Here are the transportation electrification bills we’re prioritizing this legislative session. This list may change as the session progresses, but here’s what we have our eye on now.

Picture of Anna Vanderspek Anna Vanderspek

Municipal Aggregation Comes to Rhode Island! Greener power at lower cost.

We're excited to announce the start of something good in Rhode Island. Seven cities and towns have adopted “green municipal aggregation” as a way to add more renewable energy to their electricity supply affordably. Here’s the Magnificent Seven: Barrington, Central Falls, Narragansett, Newport, Portsmouth, Providence, and South Kingstown. Better yet, starting in May, customers enrolled in these aggregations will pay a lower rate than what would be charged by Rhode Island Energy.

Green Energy Consumers Alliance

How on Earth will the grid handle all these heat pumps & EVs?

In the course of our work promoting the electrification of transportation and heating, we are often asked how the grid is going to hold up with the increased demand caused by heat pumps and electric vehicles (EVs). Recently, one of our favorite state legislators said he gets that question frequently too. So, here’s our response.

Larry Chretien & Anna Vanderspek

Phasing Out Fluorescent Light Bulbs Can Protect Health & Lower Energy Bills

Fluorescent lights are a common sight in offices, garages, and basements—but they contain toxic mercury and use far more energy than newer alternatives. By phasing out fluorescents in favor of efficient LED bulbs, Rhode Island and Massachusetts can avert a needless health risk, save families and business money on utility bills, and curb greenhouse gas emissions.

Amanda Barker & Carrie Katan

New Price Caps for Federal Tax Credit for Electric Cars

Last week, the Internal Revenue Service (IRS) and Treasury Department made a change to the federal tax credit for electric vehicles (EVs) that changes the list of eligible vehicles for 2023. This is the second big update to the federal tax credit this year, following the January decision to postpone the implementation of the complicated battery and mineral requirements in the Inflation Reduction Act (IRA).

Picture of Anna Vanderspek Anna Vanderspek

It’s Cold. Here’s What Happens to Electric Cars in Winter.

With winter in full swing, let’s talk about the change in range for electric car drivers. It’s no secret that cold temperatures reduce the range of a vehicle, whether electric or gas-powered. Recently, we hosted two webinars on the topic – one focused on winter driving in general and one focused on winter road trips. What better way to spend time indoors in the freezing cold today than catch up on the recordings?

Picture of Devan DiLibero Devan DiLibero

Massachusetts Residents: Take Action for Clean Cars!

The Massachusetts Department of Environmental Protection (DEP) recently filed the regulations needed to adopt the Advanced Clean Cars II (ACCII) regulations. As we’ve written before, these regulations are crucial for Massachusetts to reduce greenhouse gas emissions 50% by 2030. Now, there’s a chance for YOU to support these key rules, either by testifying in person before DEP on January 30 or submitting written comments by February 9. Here’s all you need to know to act.

Picture of Anna Vanderspek Anna Vanderspek