The Energy Consumer's Bulletin- a New England energy news blog

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Phasing out fossil fuels

Massachusetts Polling Shows Strong Support for Gas Utility Regulation and Electrification

Recent polling conducted by MassInc on behalf of Rewiring America and Green Energy Consumers Alliance shows strong public support for regulating gas utilities in ways that are compatible with the Commonwealth’s climate laws. The public also supports efforts aimed at switching from fossil fuel heating to electrification.

Picture of Larry Chretien Larry Chretien

Rhode Island Must Get Serious About Decarbonizing Buildings

The Act on Climate is one of the strongest climate policies in the nation, mandating that Rhode Island reduce its emissions 45% by 2030 and net-zero by 2050. However, the law is not self-implementing. For the state to meet these targets, it must implement additional policies, especially in the building sector, which accounts for nearly 40% of the state's greenhouse gas emissions (GHG). Despite this significant contribution to GHGs, Rhode Island lacks a clear, actionable plan to decarbonize buildings.

Picture of Amanda Barker Amanda Barker

How to Get Trusted Advice on Heat Pumps for your Home

Converting our heating systems from fossil fuels to electric heat pumps is an urgent step in our process of cleaning up our act in the face of mounting climate catastrophes. Both Massachusetts and Rhode Island have ambitious goals and generous incentives to speed that transition, but figuring out when and how to make the switch for your own property remains a complicated question.

Loie Hayes

Phasing out Fossil Fuels at Home: A Step by Step Family Journey

The science is clear. We all must phase out fossil fuels, the sooner the better, but no later than 2050.  But there is no one path for us all on the journey to zero carbon. Each family’s situation is different from their neighbor’s. In my family’s case, we are not all the way to zero yet, but we are making good progress. Hopefully, this story will generate some ideas for your household.

Picture of Larry Chretien Larry Chretien

The Future of Gas in Massachusetts & Rhode Island

Utility-supplied natural gas (methane) is the primary heating fuel in both Massachusetts and Rhode Island, supplying 52% and 54% of homes, respectively. Given their mandates to achieve net-zero emissions by 2050, both states are exploring strategies to transition away from their prevalent gas distribution systems. However, reducing and ultimately eliminating emissions from the heating sector, and doing so in a manner that minimizes costs to utility consumers and the state, is a formidable policy challenge. It will be an interesting journey, but one that must be taken.

Amanda Barker & Carrie Katan

Upcoming 2024 Changes to the Federal Clean Vehicle Tax Credit

The transition to electric vehicles (EVs) is a central pillar of the Biden administration’s commitment to reducing carbon emissions and combating climate change; and the federal Clean Vehicle Tax Credit is a key part of the administration’s approach. In 2024, that incentive changes in two ways: it becomes available at the point-of-sale and new battery provisions kick in that will likely reduce the number of eligible vehicle models.

Picture of Ezra Messinger Ezra Messinger

Massachusetts Funding Opportunities for Electric School Buses

A note from Green Energy Consumers: Every now and then, we like to feature a guest blog on our website. With this blog, we’re happy to feature Milia Chamas and Orly Strobel from the Massachusetts Clean Energy Center, who’ll tell you all about current opportunities for funding for electric school buses in Massachusetts.

Picture of Milia Chamas & Orly Strobel Milia Chamas & Orly Strobel

Introducing the Massachusetts Clean Heat Platform

Green Energy Consumers Alliance and our allied organizations are certain that more legislation is needed if Massachusetts is to meet its greenhouse gas emission reduction mandates. This is especially true when it comes to the state's second-largest source of emissions, the residential and commercial building sector. No one bill or policy proposed in this session is sufficient by itself to meet these objectives. However, several complementary policies have been proposed together that would move us away from fossil fuels and towards electrification.

Picture of Larry Chretien Larry Chretien