The Energy Consumer's Bulletin- a New England energy news blog

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Electric vehicles/Transportation

Car Corner: February 2024

The electric car market is always evolving. Our Car Corner quarterly blog is the Drive Green Team’s way of providing you with the latest insights, trends, and updates! We are committed to delivering a thorough update to keep our readers well-informed and empowered with the necessary knowledge to secure the best deal on the perfect car.

Picture of Ezra Messinger Ezra Messinger

New Rules for Federal Electric Vehicle Tax Credit

Back in December, we wrote about how the rules for what electric vehicles (EVs) qualify for the federal tax credit were going to change in 2024. Those changes did kick in January 2024, but so did new rules about how to claim the federal tax credit that we hadn’t expected. This blog will go over which vehicles qualify and how to claim the credit. The main kicker: you must purchase from a dealership that has registered with the IRS, whether you claim the credit when you purchase the vehicle or when you file your taxes.

Picture of Anna Vanderspek Anna Vanderspek

Everything you need to know about the Massachusetts MOR-EV rebate program in 2024

As we step into the new year, electric vehicle enthusiasts and potential buyers in Massachusetts have reason to celebrate with the latest updates to the Massachusetts MOR-EV program. This groundbreaking initiative, aimed at promoting the adoption of electric vehicles (EVs) across the state, has undergone several enhancements over the last several months, making it even more attractive for consumers. In this blog, we will do a bit of a refresher on all the programs under the MOR-EV umbrella: MOR-EV Standard, MOR-EV Used, MOR-EV+,MOR-EV Trucks, plus talk about MOR-EV Trade-in and the exciting new point-of-sale feature.

Picture of Devan DiLibero Devan DiLibero

Upcoming 2024 Changes to the Federal Clean Vehicle Tax Credit

The transition to electric vehicles (EVs) is a central pillar of the Biden administration’s commitment to reducing carbon emissions and combating climate change; and the federal Clean Vehicle Tax Credit is a key part of the administration’s approach. In 2024, that incentive changes in two ways: it becomes available at the point-of-sale and new battery provisions kick in that will likely reduce the number of eligible vehicle models.

Picture of Ezra Messinger Ezra Messinger

Massachusetts Funding Opportunities for Electric School Buses

A note from Green Energy Consumers: Every now and then, we like to feature a guest blog on our website. With this blog, we’re happy to feature Milia Chamas and Orly Strobel from the Massachusetts Clean Energy Center, who’ll tell you all about current opportunities for funding for electric school buses in Massachusetts.

Picture of Milia Chamas & Orly Strobel Milia Chamas & Orly Strobel

Massachusetts Residents: Take Action For Smart Charging Rates for Electric Cars

If you drive an electric car, it matters when you plug in and charge – both in terms of the emissions caused by the generation of each kilowatt-hour (kWh) of electricity you consume and in terms of the costs you are imposing on the system as a whole. There are lots of tools at our utilities’ disposal to encourage electric vehicle (EV) owners to charge when both emissions and costs are low, but unfortunately, in Massachusetts, our utilities are behind. Now, we have an opportunity to advocate for a smart charging policy, called a “time-of-use rate,” before the Department of Public Utilities (DPU) at a virtual public hearing at 2:00 pm on Wednesday, December 13. Here’s how to take action.

Picture of Anna Vanderspek Anna Vanderspek

Car Corner

The electric car market is evolving rapidly, which offers a mix of excitement and frustration for both enthusiasts and curious customers. The Drive Green team is deeply entrenched in the day-to-day development of the car market, and we’re here to provide you with a comprehensive update in our new quarterly blog series called Car Corner. While the electric vehicle (EV) market has certainly improved since the peak of the COVID-19 pandemic, it’s important to understand that issues with lead times still exist, from supply-chain issues to manufacturing delays. Car Corner will be a valuable resource to consumers, where we’ll navigate through the maze of misleading information and share important updates on the market, new EVs to look out for, shifts in state rebates, and some insider tips from dealerships. 

Picture of Ezra Messinger Ezra Messinger

The Economics of Battery Supply Chains: Paving the Way for Electric Vehicle Expansion

The electric vehicle revolution is well underway, promising a greener, more sustainable future for the automotive industry. However, despite the growing popularity of electric vehicles (EVs), several significant hurdles are obstructing their widespread adoption. At the forefront of these challenges are supply chain issues, particularly concerning critical components like batteries. Among the most pressing concerns is the heavy reliance on rare and essential minerals, including lithium, cobalt, and nickel, which are indispensable for battery cathodes. We’ve written before about the human rights and environmental issues with mineral mining, and that’s something we’re continuing to learn about. This blog post is more focused on the economic side. Though the supply chain for these vital materials is far from stable, and the necessary infrastructure is not yet fully developed, the last year has seen some significant progress – particularly thanks to the Inflation Reduction Act.

Picture of Ezra Messinger Ezra Messinger

Electric Cars & Costs to the Grid

As more and more people switch from gas-powered cars to electric vehicles (EVs), we hear a lot of questions along the lines of “can the grid handle it?” Sometimes that question is about supply and emissions (i.e. will we have enough clean energy resources to supply all the kilowatt-hours of electricity those EVs will need?), sometimes it’s about reliability (can the infrastructure handle it?), and sometimes it’s about costs. We've written before about how we have time and tools to prepare for this transition. This blog specifically addresses the question of the grid costs of increased EV adoption.

Picture of Anna Vanderspek Anna Vanderspek